How Did Primitivism Influence Cubism

There is no doubt that early cubists, especially Picasso, were inspired by the art of Africa and pre-Columbian South America. They were fascinated by the direct and unadorned nature of these works. This inspiration led them to make versions of African masks in their own style. These interpretations can be seen in works such as ‘Les Demoiselles d’Avignon’ and ‘The Guitarist’, which are clearly inspired by African masks. Over time, Picasso and Braque began to use cubist techniques to interpret a range of artistic traditions, including African and pre-Columbian works.

In the beginning, Picasso and other cubists looked towards the art of Africa and pre-Columbian America.

In the beginning, Picasso and other cubists looked towards the art of Africa and pre-Columbian America. This was due to their disruption with European contemporary art. Primitivism was a movement in art that was inspired by the art of Africa and pre-Columbian America. It was a reaction against European art at the time which they felt had become stale, academic and uninspired. Primitivists sought to express spiritual values through their works, which were simple in design but rich with colour and texture.

At first, they would copy African masks and statues.

The cubists were not the only artists to use cubist techniques in their work. As noted above, Picasso and Braque used them to interpret African and pre-Columbian works. But they also used them to depict other artistic traditions. For example, Matisse’s Blue Nude (1909) is a painting of his wife that uses both a vertical format and multiple perspectives. The woman’s face is shown in profile while her left arm appears more frontal than her right one (which is actually behind her). The overall effect makes it appear as if we are looking at both sides of her body simultaneously through different mirrors placed side by side on a wall, with each mirror reflecting only part of what we see; thus creating an optical illusion known as parallax

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This can be seen in ‘Les Demoiselles d’Avignon’.

The painting “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon” by Pablo Picasso is an example of cubism, which was a movement in art that began at the start of the 20th century. It can be seen as a painting of a woman, but it is also a painting of a mask. Picasso used cubist techniques to make this painting; he broke up the image into many different viewpoints, and painted each part separately.

This can be seen in ‘Les Demoiselles d’Avignon’.

They began to use cubist techniques to make their own interpretations of masks.

There are a few notable differences between the masks that Picasso and Braque produced. First, while they both reproduce naturalistic qualities of the human face, Picasso’s paintings often feature expressive eyes and mouths. In contrast to this approach, Braque’s work is more muted: his faces are often blank or expressionless (see [painting](https://www.artchive.com/artchive/B/braque_georges_fernande__le_bateau-1913/) above). Second, the setting of Picasso’s paintings are often completely flat; in contrast to this approach, Braque’s works seem more realistic and three dimensional (see [painting](https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Braque_Georges_-_La_Fille-aux-Gants-Jaune_-_1912_-_LCA_(D)_16928187340.jpg) above).

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Picasso and Braque used cubism as a catalyst for creating their own interpretations of masks—and these were two very different interpretations indeed!

Over time, Picasso and Braque used the techniques of cubism to interpret a range of artistic traditions, including African and pre-Columbian works.

Picasso and Braque were also influenced by African and pre-Columbian art. Picasso was fascinated by the style of the Dogon tribe in Mali, who are known for their masks carved from wood. In 1912, he created “The Mask” after seeing these masks at the Musée d’Ethnographie du Trocadéro in Paris. That same year, he purchased a second mask which he called “Masque de Guillaume Apollinaire” (Guillaume Apollinaire Mask) after reading his poetry about Africa in Les Peintres Cubistes: Du Cri à la Main (Cubist Painters: From Crying Out to Taking Action), an anthology co-written with André Salmon.

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Braque had originally done drawings based on African sculptures from 1905-1909 while working in Matisse’s studio during post-impressionism but did not start painting them until 1912 when he saw African objects being sold at auction at the Hôtel Drouot by Paul Guillaume who later became his dealer.[20]

Conclusion

While Picasso and Braque were the first to make use of primitivism in their art, a number of other cubist artists followed their example. Georges Braque’s work ‘Ma Jolie’, for example, is clearly inspired by African masks. The influence of primitivism in cubism can also be found in the works of Juan Gris and Fernand Léger. Even though it was an early influence, primitivism continued to have a profound impact on the development of cubism as an artistic style throughout its history.

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